Category Archives: Ford

Ford Mach-E Wrap Up and Final Thoughts

Ford Mach-E Teardown Wrap Up Munro

In this episode of Munro Live, Sandy Munro and Ben Lindamood take the viewers on a final overview of their thoughts of the Ford Mach-E after tearing it down and examining it. This episode has more than just a short overview of the vehicle, it covers some comparisons and charts not revealed in previous episodes.

Sandy and Ben first start off talking about their personal experiences with driving the vehicle. While Ben didn’t get a chance to extensively drive the vehicle, Sandy had chances before and after the teardown, thanks to Chris Billman, Chief Engineer of Ford Driver Assist Technologies, who took Sandy on a tour of the highway using the BlueCruise self driving feature. As previously noted though, Sandy still believes that the BlueCruise technology is still 6 or more years behind Tesla and that there are upcoming Chinese companies that will give rise to future competition due to their technology being more superior than what Western companies are giving them credit for.

One of the best parts of this episode is where Sandy shows a chart comparing several important attributes of the various electric vehicles that we have analyzed recently. The emphasis (in this episode) is drawing comparisons to the Ford Mach-E, Volkswagen ID.4, and the Tesla Model Y as it relates to Battery size, efficiency, and range compared to vehicle weight and drag co-efficient. This is chart points out many of the reasons we think that the vehicles get the performance that they do and point out some interesting points for improvement – but you are going to have to watch the video to get all of the good stuff.

One of Sandy’s main points is really how important an issue weight is with a vehicle, and although these electric vehicles have to take on more weight to improve their crash worthiness and safety, protecting the batteries and the occupants, there is a lot of room for improvement.

The episode goes on to talk about the body-in-white and crash safety of the Ford Mach-E which is very good as well a many places that Ford can improve on their vehicles.

To watch the full episode, click below:

Sandy Goes For a Drive Using Ford’s BlueCruise Technology

Sandy tries out Ford Mach-E trying out it's BlueCruise hands-free driver assist technology

In today’s episode of Munro Live, Sandy takes a cruze in the Ford Mach-E trying out it’s BlueCruise hands-free driver assist technology, which allows the driver to navigate 130,000 miles of pre-qualified highways throughout the country. This is Ford’s first move into truly autonomous driving where the driver isn’t required to keep their hands on the wheel unlike FSD or Autopilot.

Sandy is accompanied on this trek with Chris Billman, Chief Engineer of Ford Driver Assist Technologies, who gives an explanation of all of the benefits and features of this capability.

If you want to know all of what this technology can do and to see Sandy’s reaction to this awesome technology, click below to watch the video:

Mach-E Front Motor Blows Sandy Away!

Mach-E Front Motor Analysis Munro Live

In today’s episode of Munro Live, Sandy is absolutely blow away by the simple and Lean Design that the motor product design team has achieved on the Mach-E front Motor. From the contents of the gearbox to the rotor and stator, Sandy is impressed with Ford’s cost effective and elegant design.

With less bearings than the Tesla Model Y’s front motor the Ford Mach-E (while not having the same horse power) has a major cost and complexity advantage. The excellent and simple design of the differential made by Magna has a gears are machined in place of the forging and the design of the forged output shaft allows them to have an inline drive system.

The housing plate incorporates the ability to have the stator pressed in, which eliminates a lot of unnecessary bolts as commonly found in other motor designs. It also have grooved slots on the outside of the stator housing allowing coolant to flow around it which eliminates the need for oil, similar to the design found in the ID.4 stator housing. No filters, squirters, or extra pumps, just a simple effective solution.

Sandy goes into more depth on the rotor and it’s design as well the other parts of the drive train, electronics and connectors, the inverter (which Sandy is also very impressed with), and more but to find out what else he has to say about what he finds in this great design from Ford, you will have to watch the full video by clicking below:

Cory and Ben Break Down The Mach-E’s ADAS

SAE J3016 Levels of Driving Automation

In our latest video, Cory and Ben go over Mach-E’s Advanced Driver Assistance System, or ADAS for short.

Ben starts off by explaining that the ADAS version that Munro’s vehicle has is the Co-pilot 360 system, which is not yet a hands-free driving system, but when the updates come out it will be upgradeable to the BlueCruise capability.

From there Ben discusses the edge-of-roads camera systems that detect where the edge of the drivable space is in various environments including dirt roads or construction zones. This camera system also has blind spot assistance and intersection assist helping you to prevent lane changing into a vehicle in your blind spot as well as helping to better navigate intersections. The ADAS accomplishes all of this with 5 radar and a camera system including an ifrared camera which Ben also explains in more detail.

Ben then pulls up a chart from the SAE which describes the different levels of autonomous driving and describes that Mach-E is at Level 2 autonomy. He also explains that some level 3 vehicles exist, however, most of the ADAS systems that have been approved are Level 2.

From there Cory explains differences we have found between the Ford Mach-E and other vehicles we have analyzed, specifically Tesla as well as why Tesla has made certain choices from a business standpoint.

To watch the full video, click below:

Ford Mach-E Rear Motor Teardown and Analysis

Ford Mustang Mach-E Rear Electric Motor Teardown Sandy Munro

In this episode of Munro Live, Sandy goes into great detail about our recent teardown of the Ford Mach-E Rear electric motor.

Well, this motor isn’t exactly what Sandy expected to find in this vehicle. The part Sandy was the most impressed with was the magnets themselves, but from there is seems to be a series of pointers for improvements. From excessive laminations, buried pumps and filters, and the largest motor casing we have ever seen, there is a lot of surprises.

In general, this motor has a lot of parts and processes involved in its manufacturing and assembly, and although it has come up in other videos and popular quotes that electric vehicles have fewer parts than ICE vehicles, especially comparing engines to electric motors, but this video proves, that is not always the case.

When comparing this electric motor to Tesla’s and VW there are many points of improvement that are possible from a complexity reduction standpoint, with Sandy giving a special shout out of praise to the design of VW ID.4 motor that removes the need for an oil pump by creating an innovative component that solves this problem.

In general, this is a concise and very interesting episode that will tell you all you need to know about the Mustang Mach-E rear motor as well as providing many moments of Sandy’s subtle humor and his lifetime of design experience.

Click below to watch the video now:

The Mach-E Body in White Explained

Mach-E Body In White Episode 18

In today’s episode of Munro Live Sandy and Ben go over the “Body in White” of the Ford Mach-E. Sandy starts off with a little bit of a history lesson about why the body structure of vehicles are called the “Body in White” (or BIW for short). This stems back from the days when Ford would paint the body structure in white to check for faults or defects and the name has since stuck. Sandy also points out that he is very impressed with the structure and believes that the car will most likely recieve a 5 star crash rating.

Sandy passes the torch to Ben Lindamood who then gives some information on some of the safety testing that has already been done on the vehicle as well as weight, structural advantages, design choices that Munro likes and doesn’t as well as an analysis of space and more.

To watch the whole video, click on the link below:

Sandy’s First Look at the Ford F-150 Lightning Electric Truck!

F150 Lightning a first look

Welcome back to Munro Live’s newest installment covering the F-150 Lightning! In this long form podcast style interview, Sandy and Cory give their first impressions on Ford’s new electric truck in the F150 line.

Several topics are covered, including: On board power outlets for contractors, hobbyists, or do-it-yourselfers alike, a massive 400lbs payload frunk, interior cabin feel including infotainment, what it is like at the Ford campus and going around the Ford Test Track, an amazing multi-adjustable trailer tow with a computer validation feature, checking out the underbody of the truck, and more.

This is the first installment of a longer series, so stay tuned to catch all of Munro’s analysis of this vehcile. But first check out this weeks episode by clicking below:

Mach-E High Voltage Connector PALOOZA!!!

In this episode of Munro Live Cory and Sandy introduce and explain to the audience the different electrical connectors used in the vehicle and more importantly the different fasteners.

There are four different fasteners of different sizes and screw head types found throughout the different fastener styles. Sandy goes on to explain why this creates issues from the assembly operator’s perspective and why you should eliminate this in a lean design.

From the DC to DC converter, to the PTC Heater, HVAC Compressor, and so on, Cory walks the viewers through the different devices found within the vehicle and what connectors you will find on them. Sandy then compares these connectors to what is found on the ID.4 and gives high praise for what the design team at Volks Wagen came up with. Sandy is much more impressed with the continuity and simplicity of the connector set on the ID.4. However, he still doesn’t like that there are too many fasteners on VW’s design as well.

Sandy then moves to the Tesla Model Y and compares it’s connector designs to the Mach-E and ID.4 showing how much more simplified their design is compared to the competition.

Sandy takes some time to explain why it is so important to reduce the variety of threaded fasteners and moreover, why to reduce the amount used as much as possible and what kind of difference that will make to a company’s bottom line as well as time savings for the operators assembling these parts.

Delving into the past and “back-to-the-basics” Sandy covers ideas long espoused by Dr. Edward Demming and Eliyahu M. Goldratt in the book “The Goal” as well as others. For an aspiring engineering, this episode is a no-nonsense and to-the-point lesson in why having a lean design is key to good product development.

Click below to watch the full lesson below:

Mach-E: Battery Tray and Battery Cell Features

Mach-E Battery Cells

Is there a revolutionary cooling design in the Ford Mach-E? This episode starts off with Sandy bringing up this very topic, saying that they have found something unique inside this design.

Sandy hands over the reins to Ben as he explains what is found in each battery bay, focusing on the cooling plates and their unique design using a dimpled design pathway for the coolant to flow, similar to the “Plinko Board” from “The Price Is Right” causing the coolant to move in random directions around different areas of the plates and creates a turbulent flow that more effectively transfers heat. All of the coolant is supplied through well designed cooling lines that are attached through quick connects.

Ben also points out that it is actually the battery modules that fix the cooling plates down using the studs that protrude through the cooling plates, which is a great double use of a fastener.

Sandy and Ben then move over to look at the battery modules and cells themselves and where we get a chance to see that the Ford Mach-E and Chevy Bolt batteries are identical which makes sense as they are both supplied by LG. However, Ford made some interested improvements on the rest of the modules, using collector plates that are copper that have been nickel plated with the ends of the battery tabs welded to the plates, but more importantly, Ford chose a smart ribbon cable design for the circuitry to manage the battery cells which prevents breakage during installation and ultimately a cost savings.

From there Ben goes over a great design choice on the Ford Mach-E where Ford has placed bent aluminum strips that aligns up witht the thermal interface compound allowing them to use less compound, saving money, and helping to speed heat transfer. Ben also talks about the foam pads in between the cells which allows for expansion as the cells age.

Finally, Sandy talks about our future “best-of-best” battery tray design that we are coming up with. To catch what he says, watch the full episode below:

Cory and Ben Dive Into The Components Of The Mach-E Thermal System

Mach-E Thermal System Components explained by Cory and Ben

Cory Steuben, President of Munro & Associates, and Ben Lindamood, Account Director and lead on the Ford Mach-E teardown, take our viewers on a tour of their findings of the thermal system of the Ford Mach-E.

Cory first points out that the compressor motor needs quite a bit of power to effectively compress the refrigerant R1234YF gas and that is why in an electric vehicle it requires a high voltage line running to it. From there the refrigerant moves through the hoses into the condenser that then cools the compressed gas by having outside air run through its fins and piping from the grills opening up if the car is moving or the fan if the car is stationary. This process condenses the high pressure, high-temperature gas and dissipates the heat allowing the gas to form into a liquid.

From the condenser, the refrigerant flows through another line and into the chiller which has two functions: 1) the heat exchanger portion cools the ethylene glycol run in a loop that cools the batteries and other electric and vehicle systems and 2) leads up to the thermal expansion valve and then into the evaporator at the front of your dashboard which opens up the volume of the line and allows the compressed liquid refrigerant to revert back to a gas which drops the temperature significantly thus giving you airconditioning.

For heating of the electronics, battery, and cabin, the Ford Mach-E uses a traditional heater core which is a heat exchanger that derives its heat from a PTC (positive temperature coefficient) electric heater.

From here, Cory reviews the HVAC cooling and heating system in a Model Y, which instead uses a heat pump system that effective eliminates the need for a heater core or PTC heater. But to find out it’s advantages, you will have to click on the link below: