Tag Archives: Ford

Sandy Goes For a Drive Using Ford’s BlueCruise Technology

Sandy tries out Ford Mach-E trying out it's BlueCruise hands-free driver assist technology

In today’s episode of Munro Live, Sandy takes a cruze in the Ford Mach-E trying out it’s BlueCruise hands-free driver assist technology, which allows the driver to navigate 130,000 miles of pre-qualified highways throughout the country. This is Ford’s first move into truly autonomous driving where the driver isn’t required to keep their hands on the wheel unlike FSD or Autopilot.

Sandy is accompanied on this trek with Chris Billman, Chief Engineer of Ford Driver Assist Technologies, who gives an explanation of all of the benefits and features of this capability.

If you want to know all of what this technology can do and to see Sandy’s reaction to this awesome technology, click below to watch the video:

The Mach-E Body in White Explained

Mach-E Body In White Episode 18

In today’s episode of Munro Live Sandy and Ben go over the “Body in White” of the Ford Mach-E. Sandy starts off with a little bit of a history lesson about why the body structure of vehicles are called the “Body in White” (or BIW for short). This stems back from the days when Ford would paint the body structure in white to check for faults or defects and the name has since stuck. Sandy also points out that he is very impressed with the structure and believes that the car will most likely recieve a 5 star crash rating.

Sandy passes the torch to Ben Lindamood who then gives some information on some of the safety testing that has already been done on the vehicle as well as weight, structural advantages, design choices that Munro likes and doesn’t as well as an analysis of space and more.

To watch the whole video, click on the link below:

Mach-E High Voltage Connector PALOOZA!!!

In this episode of Munro Live Cory and Sandy introduce and explain to the audience the different electrical connectors used in the vehicle and more importantly the different fasteners.

There are four different fasteners of different sizes and screw head types found throughout the different fastener styles. Sandy goes on to explain why this creates issues from the assembly operator’s perspective and why you should eliminate this in a lean design.

From the DC to DC converter, to the PTC Heater, HVAC Compressor, and so on, Cory walks the viewers through the different devices found within the vehicle and what connectors you will find on them. Sandy then compares these connectors to what is found on the ID.4 and gives high praise for what the design team at Volks Wagen came up with. Sandy is much more impressed with the continuity and simplicity of the connector set on the ID.4. However, he still doesn’t like that there are too many fasteners on VW’s design as well.

Sandy then moves to the Tesla Model Y and compares it’s connector designs to the Mach-E and ID.4 showing how much more simplified their design is compared to the competition.

Sandy takes some time to explain why it is so important to reduce the variety of threaded fasteners and moreover, why to reduce the amount used as much as possible and what kind of difference that will make to a company’s bottom line as well as time savings for the operators assembling these parts.

Delving into the past and “back-to-the-basics” Sandy covers ideas long espoused by Dr. Edward Demming and Eliyahu M. Goldratt in the book “The Goal” as well as others. For an aspiring engineering, this episode is a no-nonsense and to-the-point lesson in why having a lean design is key to good product development.

Click below to watch the full lesson below:

Mach-E: Battery Tray and Battery Cell Features

Mach-E Battery Cells

Is there a revolutionary cooling design in the Ford Mach-E? This episode starts off with Sandy bringing up this very topic, saying that they have found something unique inside this design.

Sandy hands over the reins to Ben as he explains what is found in each battery bay, focusing on the cooling plates and their unique design using a dimpled design pathway for the coolant to flow, similar to the “Plinko Board” from “The Price Is Right” causing the coolant to move in random directions around different areas of the plates and creates a turbulent flow that more effectively transfers heat. All of the coolant is supplied through well designed cooling lines that are attached through quick connects.

Ben also points out that it is actually the battery modules that fix the cooling plates down using the studs that protrude through the cooling plates, which is a great double use of a fastener.

Sandy and Ben then move over to look at the battery modules and cells themselves and where we get a chance to see that the Ford Mach-E and Chevy Bolt batteries are identical which makes sense as they are both supplied by LG. However, Ford made some interested improvements on the rest of the modules, using collector plates that are copper that have been nickel plated with the ends of the battery tabs welded to the plates, but more importantly, Ford chose a smart ribbon cable design for the circuitry to manage the battery cells which prevents breakage during installation and ultimately a cost savings.

From there Ben goes over a great design choice on the Ford Mach-E where Ford has placed bent aluminum strips that aligns up witht the thermal interface compound allowing them to use less compound, saving money, and helping to speed heat transfer. Ben also talks about the foam pads in between the cells which allows for expansion as the cells age.

Finally, Sandy talks about our future “best-of-best” battery tray design that we are coming up with. To catch what he says, watch the full episode below:

Have a Look Inside of the Mach-E Battery Box

Have a look inside the Ford Mach-E battery box with Mark Ellis and Sandy Munro

In this episode of Munro Live, Sandy, Mark Ellis, and Victor Trevino open the Mach-E battery box up and take us on a tour of its insides.

The show starts off with a comparison of the size of the ID.4 vs the Mach-E battery box and then goes into design choices made by each company.

But the real meat of the video begins when Mark starts to explain what he finds with the batteries and the management system itself. From two different sized batteries, to a high wire count for the battery management system, there are some interesting finds within the box.

But to learn more, you will have to watch the video by clicking below:

A Quick Joy Ride For Ben in the Mach-E and Sandy’s Gripes With The ID.4 IP

Ben takes the mostly disassembled Ford Mach-E for a joy ride

In this episode of Munro Live, Ben takes what is left of the Mach-E (before removing the battery box), and has a fun quick ride around in the parking lot of Munro & Associates.

Returning to Sandy’s comments in an earlier episode about how he was surprised NOT to find a frunk in the VW ID.4 when doing a review of the vehicle, Sandy has been asked to justify this reaction, and what he finds, will intrigue our viewers: SPACE, tons of SPACE under and behind the instrument panel. This usually fought-over area is quite underutilized and unfilled, meaning that if the product design engineering teams would have decided to utilize this space and move/design some of the systems found under the hood to behind the IP, they would have had room.

Sandy will take the viewer on a comparison tour of the Mach-E vs. the ID.4 focusing on design choices that each of the respective product design engineering teams made and how things could have been different. The episode ends with Sandy also comparing the hatch designs of these two vehicles to the Tesla and lastly, wishing our viewers an (albeit belated) Happy Independence Day, and for our Canadian viewers, a happy Dominion (Canada Day).

First look at the Ford Mustang Mach-E Electric Battery

First look at the Ford Mustang Mach-E Electric Battery

In this episode of Munro Live, Sandy and Ben have a look at the electric battery setup in the Mustang Mach-E. The episode begins with Sandy and Ben looking at the underbelly of the vehicle after the battery tray has been removed. The battery tray is bolted in place under the vehicle into a rocker panel that combines together to create a structural member. This is a good design choice for the vehicle.

Going forward to the front of the car, Ben explains why the battery box also fits into an extruded aluminum piece that is also attached to a hollow cast aluminum piece behind the front craddle in order to create a crush zone, protecting the battery in a front collision.

Sandy and ben then go on to explain the connectors going to the battery and what they are for and finally they talk about the structural aspects of the battery box itself.

From there Sandy and Ben go through a chart comparing different electric vehicles batteries ranges, capacity and weights. Sandy puts out a special plea to help Audi with some of their designs that we think could be improved… for a cost of course, but to understand why, you will have to watch the video by clicking below:

Ford Maverick Review with Chief Engineer Chris Mazur

Ford Maverick Review with Chief Engineer Chris Mazur

In this episode of Munro Live, Sandy is lead by Chief Engineer Chris Mazur through the new Ford Maverick and all of it’s great details and features. Sandy himself says that this is a great intro to electric vehicles for your kid going to college or your own multipurpose EV.

From the interior to the exterior, performance to enhancements, and even walking through a prototype of the bed of the truck, Chris shows the audience everything a prospective buyer would want to know about this vehicle.

To watch the whole video, click on the link below:

What Is The Mystery Box? Mach-E Teardown

Mystery Box Ford Mach-E

What Is The Mystery Box? Mach-E Teardown

In this episode, Ben Lindamood from Munro explains what the mystery box marked “Do Not Drop” from the last video actually is.  It turns out it is “Offboard Charge Controller” which works with the DC fast charging systems in the car to directly charge the battery, but modulates the current to keep it between 200-600V.

The episode goes on to talk about taking off the doors and certain things that we found, including communication anomalies that Sandy hasn’t see before.  The shows winds itself up with Ben talking about the Infortainment system and interiors.  Watch here for the full episode:

Whoa! Mach-E Thermal System Nightmare!

Mach-E Thermal System Nightmare

Whoa! Mach-E Thermal System Nightmare!

In this dramatic episode of Munro Live, feel the fear of Sandy as he is shocked with what he finds in the Ford Mach-E Thermal System.  After a brief faint and being revived by the Octovalve, Sandy uncovers a winding snake pit mess of hoses and pumps that we are sure to confuse mechanic and assembly worker alike.  Most likely in an attempt to save money by using off the shelf parts, this is by far one of the worst cooling designs we have seen at Munro.

This video attempts to describe the complex path that this cooling system takes.  Warning this video is not for the faint of heart.  To watch it in all it’s hilarity, click below: